KTA-KTOB NEWSLETTERS

 Spring/Summer 2014  
 Fall 2013
 Spring/Summer 2013

 KTA-KTOB NEWS 

The American Horse Council Foundation (AHCF) has announced that it will be extending the deadline to take the survey to update the National Economic Impact Study to September 4th.
A request by Kentucky Downs to offer its races this September on a New Jersey betting exchange has been removed from the agenda of an Aug. 15 meeting of the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission, likely scuttling the plan for this year.
Keeneland Racecourse will raise its takeout for the October meet from 16 percent to 17.5 percent on win, place, and show wagers and from 19 percent to 22 percent on all other bets, the maximum allowed under state law, Keeneland officials confirmed on Tuesday.
Keeneland today announced the expansion of its lucrative September Sale Bonus Program to include a Sellers Program, which, together with the previously announced Book 1 Bonus, will offer cash rewards to horses sold at the September Yearling Sale that win graded or group stakes. The September Sale Bonus Program begins with graduates of the 2017 September Sale, to be held Sept. 11-23. Officials also confirmed details of a revised September Sale format that this year opens with an exclusive one-day Book 1 followed by a three-day Book 2, with the goal to showcase a critical mass of upper-market horses during Week 1 of the sale.
Because of business surpassing projections—including a best-ever July with its historical horse racing operation—every horse running at Kentucky Downs' highly acclaimed September meet will earn at least $750.
A committee of the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission voted on Tuesday to recommend approval of a plan by Kentucky Downs to allow New Jersey customers of an exchange-wagering company to bet on the track’s races, but not before the plan satisfied three requirements.
A native of central Kentucky, Mark grew up working around Gainesway Farm where his father Joe was manager for forty years. In 1991 Mark graduated from Clemson University with a B.A. in English. Upon graduation, Mark returned to the horse business where he worked for Hall of Fame trainer Ron McAnally in California before spending a year in Dubai working in Sheikh Mohammed’s Dubai Racing Operation. In 1994 Mark joined his brothers full time as partner in Taylor Made Sales Agency. He is currently Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Taylor Made. Mark is the previous President of the Consignors and Breeders Association (CBA) and remains a member of the CBA Board of Directors. In addition to serving on the Board and as Secretary of KTA/KTOB, Mark is also a former trustee of the Breeders’ Cup.
Churchill Downs Inc. CEO Bill Carstanjen said Thursday that the company is finalizing the design for a $60 million historical-race wagering facility at its former Trackside training and simulcast wagering facility on Poplar Level Road in Louisville.
On Monday, a controversial eight-foot fence and landscaping plans were approved for the continually expanding parking at Churchill Downs. The plans were approved by the Zoning Board of Appeals.
Dermot Ryan is the manager of Ashford Stud, the American division of Coolmore Stud. A native of Co. Tipperary, Ireland, Dermot graduated from the Irish National Stud Thoroughbred Breeding Course before taking a position with Coolmore Stud in Ireland. Following eight years working for Coolmore in Ireland, Dermot relocated to Coolmore America in 1993. Dermot was a founding member of the Consignors and Commercial Breeders Association and also spent two terms on the board of the Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association. He is currently a member of the Board of Directors of the University of Kentucky Gluck Equine Research Foundation.

 [News Archive]

KTA-KTOB FARM PROFILES

A native of Maryland, Wayne Sweezey, who owns and manages Timber Town Stable with his wife Cathy, came to Kentucky in 1975. He worked for trainer Doug Davis for a year, and then went to college at the University of Kentucky to study agriculture. After college, Sweezey worked in management at a couple different farms, including as an assistant at Manchester Farm and general manager of Jaredcrest for 10 years. In 1998, John Phillips offered Sweezey the position of Sales Director at his family’s Darby Dan Farm. Sweezey readily accepted, and in his first year the farm sold a yearling for $1.7 million. Soon thereafter Sweezey was named Manager of the entire operation. After eight years, Sweezey became General Manager and Partner of Darby Dan Farm, a job which he stayed in for a decade.
From dream to reality, Suzi Shoemaker has proven that with enough passion and drive you can make dreams come true. Shoemaker grew up in upstate New York with very few ties to the Kentucky equine industry let alone the Thoroughbred industry. She rode Saddlebreds, showing from the time she was 15 until she graduated from Cornell University with a degree in Animal Science. It was on a vacation during college that she fell in love with Kentucky.
Catherine Parke, a graduate of the University of Kentucky with a degree in Animal Science, always knew Kentucky was home. Originally from Ohio, Parke explained, “I think in a past life I must have been raised here because I don’t want to be anywhere else.” This desire to make Kentucky her permanent home led to the founding of Valkyre Stud in 1978. After teaching hunter and jumper riding lessons after college, Parke wanted to change focus to the Thoroughbred industry and began working for Henry White, an internationally renowned and respected third-generation horseman. Parke gained valuable farm experience with White by working in the office, breaking yearlings, helping with veterinarian work, etc.
Jackie “Jody” Huckabay, Jr. and his late father, Dr. Jackie Huckabay, founded Elm Tree Farm in Bourbon County, Kentucky in 1989. The property was once known as “Clark’s Station” and was built in 1784 by Dr. Robert Clark, a lieutenant in the Revolutionary War. It was home to Elizabeth Station, a part of the railroad which connected Frankfort to Paris and linked the mainline of “The Whiskey Route” which serviced many of Kentucky’s world-famous bourbon distilleries.
Byron “Scooter” Hughes was raised in the Thoroughbred industry. Both his parents were actively involved in the business, and Hughes was raised first on Greentree Farm, and then on Dr. and Mrs. Elsie Asbury’s Forest Retreat Farm near Carlisle.
Tony Holmes, born in Christchurch, New Zealand, dreamed of coming to Kentucky to become more involved in the Thoroughbred business. Before landing in Kentucky, he worked as a mechanical engineer apprentice, worked at a large mining town in outback Western Australia, after which he worked on dairy farms in New Zealand. After time spent on dairy farms, he began employment in the Thoroughbred industry working his first breeding season in New Zealand followed by a breeding season on a farm in Australia.
John and Martha Jane Mulholland’s Mulholland Springs in Northern Fayette County has a unique vision that truly emphasizes “family” and serves as the basis of its entire Thoroughbred operation. That perspective may not appear on first inspection but as its story unfolds it is apparent that the farm strives to maintain a connection to the past as a means to ensure sustainable quality for the future.
Something small and organic is being exported out of Oldham County in northwestern Kentucky but it may not be what you’d initially expect. An enthusiastic group of Thoroughbred fans, owners, and breeders with roots in Oldham County are exporting throughout Kentucky a message to “ordinary folks” about the importance of a robust horse industry.
Trainer Phil Sims is having a tremendous 2013 as a trainer. Currently stabled at Oaklawn Park in Hot Springs, Arkansas, Sims is winning at a 28% clip and rate of 57% in the money finishes. Though having only saddled 14 horses so far in 2013 it seems to appear that Sims may be “on track” to have a career year.
Nestled in between Lexington and Paris are the 300 acres that encompasses Damian and Braxton Lynch’s Royal Oak Farm. Royal Oak has 55 stalls for the Broodmares, foals, and sales prep horses that currently reside at the farm and hosts boarders such as the breeder of Union Rags, Phyllis M. Wyeth, along with Lynch homebreds.
Darby Dan Farm: Quality Runs in the Family It seems as everything old is new again at Darby Dan Farm in Lexington, Kentucky. Excitement for the forthcoming 2013 thoroughbred breeding season is high amongst the team at the farm as they make final preparations for the arrival of new foals and productive broodmares. The hopefulness surrounding a promising new generation of thoroughbreds mirrors the current reinvigorated identity of one of the most historic pieces of land in Central Kentucky.
The cheers emanating from Clarkland Farm for Beholder in the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Fillies on November 2nd may have been heard clear into neighboring counties throughout Central Kentucky as the filly crossed the finish line first at Santa Anita Race Track in Arcadia, California. The palpable excitement was due to the fact that the team at Clarkland Farm was responsible for mating, foaling, and raising the championship-caliber filly.