KTA-KTOB NEWSLETTERS

 Spring/Summer 2014  
 Fall 2013
 Spring/Summer 2013

 KTA-KTOB NEWS 

Licensed trainer for 30 years. Stabled year-round at Keeneland and currently on the Kentucky, Chicago, and New Orleans circuit. Current Director of Kentucky Thoroughbred Association/Kentucky Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders, Inc. Owner and operator of Sunnyside Farm in Paris, KY.
Keeneland will require jockeys competing in the 2017 Fall Meet, which begins Friday, to complete a baseline concussion assessment prior to being allowed to ride. Keeneland is among the first race tracks in the U.S. to establish concussion management and return to participation protocol.
The fifth September Meet in the 143-year history of Churchill Downs concluded Oct. 1 following an 11-day run highlighted by notable performances by rising Thoroughbreds that included $200,000 Lukas Classic (G III) winner Honorable Duty and rising 2-year-olds The Tabulator and Patrona Margarita; the exploits of human stars headed by record-setting jockey Corey Lanerie; and spectacular early-autumn weather that helped attract smiling crowds to special events scheduled throughout the increasingly popular racing session.
Paul was born in Louisville, Kentucky in 1962 and resides there with wife Angie, who manages payroll for McGee's public stable. They have four children - Matthew, Margaret, Alex and Eddie. Paul grew up in the Derby City where he and his three siblings – all first-generation horsemen – developed their interest in racing through their proximity to Churchill Downs. Brother Marty is a columnist for the Daily Racing Form; younger sister Amy is married to and keeps the books for Southern California-based trainer Ron Ellis whose stable includes Declan's Moon, 2004's 2-year-old champion; and older sister Susan has previously worked in group sales for Hollywood Park. Paul got his start in racing at age 15 by walking hots for conditioner Jerry Calvin and later galloped horses for trainers Angel Montano Sr. and Carl Bowman. After attending Louisville’s St. Xavier High School, he graduated from Bellarmine University with a degree in chemistry. “My Dad sells water treatment chemicals,” McGee said. “It was kind of a fall-back. If it didn't work out at the racetrack, I would go to work for him. He never objected to me coming to the racetrack. He’s 100 percent behind me."
United Tote, the provider of pari-mutuel tote services to more than 150 racing operations including Churchill Downs Racetrack, has implemented the necessary technological changes to begin processing wagers and payouts that will benefit horseplayers around the world. The positive changes will come into effect Thursday.
Ben Haggin has been involved with Woodford Racing since 2005. Ben is a graduate of Vanderbilt University and Woodberry Forest School. Ben has worked in nearly every facet of the Thoroughbred industry. He has worked for Mill Ridge Farm, Hall of Fame Trainer Ron McAnally and Equibase Company. Ben was an original employee of the National Thoroughbred Racing Association. Ben presently serves on the Board of the Keeneland Association, the Saratoga Reading Rooms and has served on the Board of the Race for Education and the Thoroughbred Club of America. Ben is active on the Boards of Sayre School and the High Street YMCA in Lexington, Kentucky. Ben is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Lee Haggin III. Mr. Haggin is a member of the Jockey Club and is a Trustee of the Keeneland Association. Ben’s great-grandfather, Hal Price Headley, was a founder of the Keeneland Association.
Gross sales for Keeneland September yearling sale exceeded $300 million for the first time since 2008, when Hip 3313 (an Afleet Alex colt) sold for $16,000 during the Sept. 21 session of the 12-day auction.
Kentucky residents may soon be able to wager on their favorite sports team. A bill filed today by Senator Julian M. Carroll, D-Frankfort, sets the framework to allow any horse racing track or off-track wagering facility to offer sports wagering.
Hutton Goodman is a native of Texas and a graduate of the University of Virginia who now lives in Lexington, Kentucky with his wife Alexandra Goodman. He has been involved in the Thoroughbred industry for his entire life and has experience in many different aspects of the industry. Hutton worked on the race track for trainer Michael Stidham until he decided to return home to work for his family’s Mt. Brilliant Farm in Lexington. Mt. Brilliant Farm is a broodmare operation based north of Lexington that has 30 broodmares and 17 horses in training on three continents. At Mt. Brilliant Hutton has been involved in the farms breeding, sales and racing operation in the USA, UK, Ireland, Argentina and Australia. He currently serves as racing manager at Mt. Brilliant Farm. In addition to his equine interests Hutton serves as chairman of the board of the Mt. Brilliant Family Foundation a charitable foundation and supporter of The Fayette Alliance.
Churchill Downs, Inc. and Keeneland Association jointly announced plans Friday morning to construct two new racing facilities in southern Kentucky, but officials from the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission countered with a tersely written statement late Friday afternoon, casting serious doubt on the project.

 [News Archive]

KTA-KTOB FARM PROFILES

A native of Maryland, Wayne Sweezey, who owns and manages Timber Town Stable with his wife Cathy, came to Kentucky in 1975. He worked for trainer Doug Davis for a year, and then went to college at the University of Kentucky to study agriculture. After college, Sweezey worked in management at a couple different farms, including as an assistant at Manchester Farm and general manager of Jaredcrest for 10 years. In 1998, John Phillips offered Sweezey the position of Sales Director at his family’s Darby Dan Farm. Sweezey readily accepted, and in his first year the farm sold a yearling for $1.7 million. Soon thereafter Sweezey was named Manager of the entire operation. After eight years, Sweezey became General Manager and Partner of Darby Dan Farm, a job which he stayed in for a decade.
From dream to reality, Suzi Shoemaker has proven that with enough passion and drive you can make dreams come true. Shoemaker grew up in upstate New York with very few ties to the Kentucky equine industry let alone the Thoroughbred industry. She rode Saddlebreds, showing from the time she was 15 until she graduated from Cornell University with a degree in Animal Science. It was on a vacation during college that she fell in love with Kentucky.
Catherine Parke, a graduate of the University of Kentucky with a degree in Animal Science, always knew Kentucky was home. Originally from Ohio, Parke explained, “I think in a past life I must have been raised here because I don’t want to be anywhere else.” This desire to make Kentucky her permanent home led to the founding of Valkyre Stud in 1978. After teaching hunter and jumper riding lessons after college, Parke wanted to change focus to the Thoroughbred industry and began working for Henry White, an internationally renowned and respected third-generation horseman. Parke gained valuable farm experience with White by working in the office, breaking yearlings, helping with veterinarian work, etc.
Jackie “Jody” Huckabay, Jr. and his late father, Dr. Jackie Huckabay, founded Elm Tree Farm in Bourbon County, Kentucky in 1989. The property was once known as “Clark’s Station” and was built in 1784 by Dr. Robert Clark, a lieutenant in the Revolutionary War. It was home to Elizabeth Station, a part of the railroad which connected Frankfort to Paris and linked the mainline of “The Whiskey Route” which serviced many of Kentucky’s world-famous bourbon distilleries.
Byron “Scooter” Hughes was raised in the Thoroughbred industry. Both his parents were actively involved in the business, and Hughes was raised first on Greentree Farm, and then on Dr. and Mrs. Elsie Asbury’s Forest Retreat Farm near Carlisle.
Tony Holmes, born in Christchurch, New Zealand, dreamed of coming to Kentucky to become more involved in the Thoroughbred business. Before landing in Kentucky, he worked as a mechanical engineer apprentice, worked at a large mining town in outback Western Australia, after which he worked on dairy farms in New Zealand. After time spent on dairy farms, he began employment in the Thoroughbred industry working his first breeding season in New Zealand followed by a breeding season on a farm in Australia.
John and Martha Jane Mulholland’s Mulholland Springs in Northern Fayette County has a unique vision that truly emphasizes “family” and serves as the basis of its entire Thoroughbred operation. That perspective may not appear on first inspection but as its story unfolds it is apparent that the farm strives to maintain a connection to the past as a means to ensure sustainable quality for the future.
Something small and organic is being exported out of Oldham County in northwestern Kentucky but it may not be what you’d initially expect. An enthusiastic group of Thoroughbred fans, owners, and breeders with roots in Oldham County are exporting throughout Kentucky a message to “ordinary folks” about the importance of a robust horse industry.
Trainer Phil Sims is having a tremendous 2013 as a trainer. Currently stabled at Oaklawn Park in Hot Springs, Arkansas, Sims is winning at a 28% clip and rate of 57% in the money finishes. Though having only saddled 14 horses so far in 2013 it seems to appear that Sims may be “on track” to have a career year.
Nestled in between Lexington and Paris are the 300 acres that encompasses Damian and Braxton Lynch’s Royal Oak Farm. Royal Oak has 55 stalls for the Broodmares, foals, and sales prep horses that currently reside at the farm and hosts boarders such as the breeder of Union Rags, Phyllis M. Wyeth, along with Lynch homebreds.
Darby Dan Farm: Quality Runs in the Family It seems as everything old is new again at Darby Dan Farm in Lexington, Kentucky. Excitement for the forthcoming 2013 thoroughbred breeding season is high amongst the team at the farm as they make final preparations for the arrival of new foals and productive broodmares. The hopefulness surrounding a promising new generation of thoroughbreds mirrors the current reinvigorated identity of one of the most historic pieces of land in Central Kentucky.
The cheers emanating from Clarkland Farm for Beholder in the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Fillies on November 2nd may have been heard clear into neighboring counties throughout Central Kentucky as the filly crossed the finish line first at Santa Anita Race Track in Arcadia, California. The palpable excitement was due to the fact that the team at Clarkland Farm was responsible for mating, foaling, and raising the championship-caliber filly.