Our Mission

We are committed to long-term solutions that will enable us to protect and promote the Thoroughbred industry.  We strive to increase our influence on issues that impact our industry locally, nationally, and internationally.

Kentucky Thoroughbred Association

A group of Kentucky's finest horsemen formed the Kentucky Thoroughbred Association (KTA) in 1983 with two primary goals. The first was to unite the industry by addressing long-term problems and representing the Thoroughbred industry on a national basis. The second was to maintain the highest standards of racing, breeding and training in the Commonwealth.

Kentucky Thoroughbred Owners & Breeders

The state's leading breeders founded the Thoroughbred Breeders of Kentucky, Inc. in 1961. TBK focused on promoting and protecting the Thoroughbred industry in Kentucky. Renamed Kentucky Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders, Inc. (KTOB) in 1980, the organization expanded to include owners as well as breeders. 

This Day in History

Check back tomorrow for the next "This Day in History"


KTA-KTOB News & Announcements

The Kentucky Horse Racing Commission today announced payment of more than $14.2 million in breeder awards from the Kentucky Thoroughbred Breeders' Incentive Fund. Kentucky-bred horses won over 4,000 races across the globe in 2018, which made breeders eligible for these incentive payments. KTBIF horses won in 33 states and four countries - including the Kentucky Derby.
Like many, he was lured into the horse business by his father Howard Litt, an avid owner, breeder and race fan of over fifty years. Litt received his B.A. from UC Berkeley in Human Biodynamics and my M.S. from Wake Forest University in Exercise Physiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation before embarking on his career in the horse business. He moved to Kentucky in 2000 and worked at Taylor Made farm for a year, working with mares, yearling, foals at major auctions. Litt worked the next two years with the veterinary practice of Dr. Cheney, Dr. Northrop and Dr. Landry in Kentucky, New York and Florida and was around the top trainers and horses in the east coast. He then spent seven years with Three Chimneys farm performing all duties of a bloodstock agent as well as, stallion syndication, portfolio management and client recruitment.
A bill that would legalize wagering on sporting events and earmark tax revenue to Kentucky’s underfunded pension system received a hearing at a legislative committee meeting in Frankfort Wednesday morning. House Bill 175, sponsored by Rep. Adam Koenig, R-Erlanger, would allow Kentuckians to not just wager on most sporting events around the country, but also set up a regulatory framework for residents to legally play online poker and fantasy sports contests, with the state receiving revenue from taxes, registration fees and licensing fees.
“The NTRA is pleased to collaborate with Dean Dorton to offer this special tax webinar for the horse racing and breeding industry,” said Alex Waldrop, President and CEO of the NTRA. “Last year’s sweeping federal tax reform legislation was the first of its kind in more than 30 years and is full of changes best explained by the experienced equine tax accountants at Dean Dorton.”


 



Board Profile:

Like many, he was lured into the horse business by his father Howard Litt, an avid owner, breeder and race fan of over fifty years. Litt received his B.A. from UC Berkeley in Human Biodynamics and my M.S. from Wake Forest University in Exercise Physiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation before embarking on his career in the horse business. He moved to Kentucky in 2000 and worked at Taylor Made farm for a year, working with mares, yearling, foals at major auctions. Litt worked the next two years with the veterinary practice of Dr. Cheney, Dr. Northrop and Dr. Landry in Kentucky, New York and Florida and was around the top trainers and horses in the east coast. He then spent seven years with Three Chimneys farm performing all duties of a bloodstock agent as well as, stallion syndication, portfolio management and client recruitment.